Stakeholder – Kat Masters http://katmasters.com/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 01:50:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://katmasters.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T173039.237-150x150.png Stakeholder – Kat Masters http://katmasters.com/ 32 32 Vancouver city council to decide road tolls after October election https://katmasters.com/vancouver-city-council-to-decide-road-tolls-after-october-election/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 01:50:00 +0000 https://katmasters.com/vancouver-city-council-to-decide-road-tolls-after-october-election/ Vancouver City Council’s key decision on whether to move forward with advanced planning for transportation pricing – such as road tolls – in downtown Vancouver will be made in 2023. A recent internal memo from city staff indicates that city council will make the decision to go ahead and refine the recommended transport pricing option […]]]>

Vancouver City Council’s key decision on whether to move forward with advanced planning for transportation pricing – such as road tolls – in downtown Vancouver will be made in 2023.

A recent internal memo from city staff indicates that city council will make the decision to go ahead and refine the recommended transport pricing option (also known as mobility pricing) next year. , after the municipal elections of October 2022.

City staff are still expected to report by the end of 2022 on stakeholder engagement and feedback, as well as the results of the feasibility study, before making any further recommendations. No crucial decisions are expected to be made in this year’s update, but it’s unclear whether the update will take place before or right after the election.

As a result of the update, city staff will develop transportation pricing schemes in 2023 that include limits and potential fares, for public consultation, and then considered by city council in the key decision.

If city council approves new planning in 2023, the final city council decision on whether to implement transportation pricing would be made in 2024, after city staff made improvements to the program.

The form of transportation pricing for vehicles entering and exiting the downtown Vancouver Peninsula could be implemented in 2026, a year later than originally planned. The whole project towards implementation has four planning phases, starting with the current feasibility study.

Transportation pricing was one of 32 projects in the City Staff Climate Emergency Action Plan (CEAP), which was approved by city council in November 2020. At the time, it was estimated that it would incur a technology and installation cost of $ 250 million, which would be covered by a net annual income of $ 50-80 million after covering ongoing capital and operating costs.

City council then set aside $ 1.5 million for initial planning work, including $ 700,000 in 2021 for a dedicated team and consultants to conduct economic analysis and consult with stakeholders. The remaining $ 800,000 will be spent in 2022 to “complete stakeholder engagement”.

The recent update provides City Council with highlights of the preliminary planning carried out to date since the end of 2020.

In September 2021, the city hired Mott Macdonald, Lucent Quay and KI Squared as a team of consultants for the first phase of the transportation pricing planning work through spring 2022, which focuses on stakeholder consultation, preparation an analysis of Vancouver’s transportation system and the preparation of a “draft evaluation framework and ‘building blocks’” of transportation pricing systems.

Of note, the City of Vancouver has since signed a memorandum of understanding with TransLink on transportation pricing and is working on a partnership to include “a regional perspective for downtown transportation pricing”. Additionally, city staff have also contacted the three North Shore municipalities – as North Shore residents rely on travel through the Lions Gate Bridge and downtown Vancouver to access the rest. of the region – and the provincial government, which holds the jurisdictional authority. on road toll mechanisms.

In November and December 2021, municipal staff and the team of consultants conducted approximately 80 interviews with stakeholder organizations – representing businesses, essential services, residents, tourists, and people who depend on private vehicles, active transport and public transport for their work – to gather their priorities, interests and concerns.

A series of workshops with stakeholders will be held in January and February 2022, followed by additional workshops or interviews with other stakeholders in March and April.

The debate on the CEAP decision of the city council in November 2020 largely focused on the potential for transport pricing. At the time, the downtown road toll proposal was heavily criticized by business groups – given concerns about the impact on businesses, especially with the expected economic fallout from COVID-19 on several years – and city officials and regional leaders stressing the importance of a broader regional perspective than had been presented by City of Vancouver staff.

There are also concerns that the revenues collected by the City of Vancouver through its municipal road toll system will divert significant revenues from a possible future regional mobility pricing system intended to help finance the costs of operation and development. expansion of TransLink. As the transition to battery electric vehicles accelerates, the transit company needs new sources of revenue to replace its declining fuel tax revenues.

In October 2021, Vancouver City Council narrowly voted in a vote to scrap the controversial plan by city staff to enact mandatory parking permits for all residential streets, effective February 2022. It was about of the second largest CEAP project.


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Ministry to continue dialogue with stakeholders – FBC News https://katmasters.com/ministry-to-continue-dialogue-with-stakeholders-fbc-news/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 00:58:28 +0000 https://katmasters.com/ministry-to-continue-dialogue-with-stakeholders-fbc-news/ The decision to reopen the schools took into account a number of factors, including the potential health risks as well as the impact of school closures on students. Education Minister Premila Kumar urges Fijians to apply an evidence-based and practical approach to COVID-19. Kumar says the government recognizes the importance of education and is committed […]]]>

The decision to reopen the schools took into account a number of factors, including the potential health risks as well as the impact of school closures on students.

Education Minister Premila Kumar urges Fijians to apply an evidence-based and practical approach to COVID-19.

Kumar says the government recognizes the importance of education and is committed to supporting the continuity of learning in the classroom.

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“The risk that children will not be in school continues to be greater than the risk that they will be in school. Children are deprived of social and mental development. A specific group of school staff has been trained and tasked with monitoring students and teachers who may be showing symptoms of COVID-19. “

Kumar assured that the Ministry of Education will continue its regular dialogue with stakeholders to support schools and ensure the safety of students and teachers.

Working with the Ministry of Health, the World Health Organization and UNICEF, the ministry also revised the school reopening guidelines, which were sent to schools last week to guide and support schools on the way to create and maintain a safe school environment.

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How nature is more than a carbon sink https://katmasters.com/how-nature-is-more-than-a-carbon-sink/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:40:12 +0000 https://katmasters.com/how-nature-is-more-than-a-carbon-sink/ Discussions on carbon credits at COP26 highlighted how difficult it is to apply a global standard to complex regulatory and physical landscapes in various geographies. Carbon credits should not be viewed in isolation: forests, biodiversity and the communities that support nature-based climate solutions are also an essential part of the equation. Restorasi Ekosistem Riau is […]]]>
  • Discussions on carbon credits at COP26 highlighted how difficult it is to apply a global standard to complex regulatory and physical landscapes in various geographies.
  • Carbon credits should not be viewed in isolation: forests, biodiversity and the communities that support nature-based climate solutions are also an essential part of the equation.
  • Restorasi Ekosistem Riau is not only one of the last intact peatland forests, it is also an example of successful integration of biodiversity, community and climate strategies and actions.

Carbon credits are a commodity to be valued and traded. They are also a weather bell for investment rates in climate and nature. Discussions on carbon credits at the COP26 meeting in Glasgow were ultimately inconclusive, but they highlighted how difficult it is to apply a global standard to complex regulatory and physical landscapes in various geographies.

Too often, discussions about carbon credits miss this larger point. Whether the product of avoidance, reduction or elimination, carbon credits should not be viewed in isolation: forests, biodiversity and the communities that support nature-based climate solutions are also essential. an essential part of the equation.

When forests retain more carbon than they emit, they become a carbon sink. Carbon sinks serve as a store of carbon that can be measured and valued, and then potentially offset by emissions generated by activities elsewhere.

But that’s only half the story. In landscapes like the tropical swamp forests of Indonesia, where protecting natural forests is vital for biodiversity and wildlife, it is also imperative to support communities that depend on forests for ecosystem services and livelihoods. While the relationship between the two is complex in science, carbon, biodiversity and community are indivisible on the forest floor.

Landscapes that offer multiple advantages

The APRIL Group’s peatland forest restoration project, Restorasi Ekosistem Riau (RER), is one example. The project has been registered with Verra and is potentially one of the largest carbon projects in the world, generating around 6.8 million tonnes of carbon credits per year. But over 150,000 hectares – an area the size of Greater London – located on the Kampar Peninsula and neighboring Padang Island in Riau Province, the RER is a complete landscape offering multiple benefits.


After many years of forest restoration and active protection work in partnership with organizations such as Fauna & Flora International, the real biodiversity benefits that derive from a landscape approach have emerged. These include a growing number of species with 823 species of plants and animals recorded in the restoration zone in 2020 – many of which are listed by IUCN as of conservation concern. This figure was up from 797 the previous year. Sumatran tigers, including one rescued and reintroduced to the landscape last year following a multi-stakeholder operation, and other rare native wildlife, such as the flathead cat, have been spotted and studied on camera traps.

RER biodiversity

Editable hawk-eagle

Image: Prayitno Goenarto (RER)

The communities living in and around the restoration forest play a vital role, supported by respectful engagement and education. From improving fishing practices to maintaining subsistence catches while increasing water quality within the restoration zone, to sustainable production of forest honey and other forest products for sale commercial, employed by forest rangers to guard against encroachment, wildlife poaching and fires, RER has its own economic and ecological ecosystem, where communities are engaged as active partners.

The RER also has the potential to provide a unique location to facilitate cutting-edge scientific research. Its eco-research camp and other facilities on the edge of the restoration area provide access to scientists from all over the world to conduct their own research. The site can serve as a laboratory for tropical peatland science, exploiting and improving existing data on greenhouse gas emissions, hydrology, and landscape-level flora and fauna surveys.

The protection and restoration of the forest area contributes multiple values, and the stored carbon will make an important contribution to the financing of this important work. RER’s production-protection approach, where the conservation area is surrounded by a ring of plantations, means that the sustainable plantations support the technical and financial capacities necessary for large-scale conservation and restoration. In this case, the value generated by this carbon pool will be reinvested in further restoration and conservation work.

Catalyst for landscape protection

The reason the RER is so important isn’t just because it’s one of the last intact peatland forests. It is also an example of the successful integration of biodiversity, community and climate strategies and actions, and private-public-NGO partnerships.

Unfortunately, biodiversity does not have such commitments as the climate target of 1.5 degrees Celsius or an equivalent unifying ‘net zero’ target. This makes it more difficult to monitor and evaluate progress in a globally accepted way. The post-2020 global biodiversity framework of the Convention on Biological Diversity and the work of the Science Based Targets Network to align SBTs with the sustainable development framework and goals may provide more answers. But that is no reason to delay action. Restoring and protecting forests is widely recognized as one of the most cost-effective methods of reducing carbon. And the benefits of well-managed forest protection and restoration for biodiversity are clear.

Activities demonstrating their ability to remove CO2 from the atmosphere or prevent CO2 emissions are verified by an independent standard and issued in the form of carbon credit certificates (representing one tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent).

Standards are organizations, usually NGOs, that certify that a particular project meets its stated goals and stated volume of emissions. Some of the most important standards include the United Nations Clean Development Mechanism, Verra, the American Carbon Registry, the Climate Action Reserve, and the Gold Standard.

Carbon credits can be grouped into three main categories: avoidance projects (they completely avoid emitting greenhouse gases), reduction projects (they reduce the volume of greenhouse gases emitted into the atmosphere) and elimination (they remove greenhouse gases directly from the atmosphere).

Forest avoidance projects or programs known as REDD + (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) prevent deforestation or destruction of wetlands. Other examples include soil management practices in agriculture that limit greenhouse gas emissions, such as projects to avoid emissions from dairy cows and beef cattle through different diets.

Removing carbon from the atmosphere can include afforestation and reforestation projects and the management of wetlands, which, as they grow, transform CO2 into solid carbon stored in their trunks and roots.

The reduction category includes projects that primarily focus on reducing the demand for energy efficiency, including stove projects, energy efficiency or the development of energy efficient buildings.

International Voluntary Carbon Markets (VCMs) provide a platform for individuals and organizations to offset / balance their unavoidable and residual emissions by purchasing and withdrawing (undoing in a registry after which it can no longer be sold) of credits. carbon emitted by sellers who overshoot carbon – either because they have avoided emissions or have undertaken additional activities that reduce or eliminate emissions.

While compliance markets are currently limited to carbon credits from a specific region, voluntary carbon credits are significantly more fluid, not constrained by boundaries set by nation states or political unions. They can also be accessed by all sectors of the economy instead of a limited number of industries. The Scaling Voluntary Carbon Markets Task Force estimates that the carbon credit market could be worth more than $ 50 billion by 2030.

Carbon credits can be a catalyst for landscape protection and restoration, funding additional forest conservation and restoration, as well as offsetting emissions from business activities. While the value of carbon credits can be expressed in dollars, equal consideration to nature’s biodiversity and community health unleashes real value and commitment to conservation. It is the investment in restoration and conservation that generates carbon value and offers a return on biodiversity gain where the two are deeply interconnected. Completely decoupling carbon from its context – treating it as a commodity – can undermine the biodiversity and community engagement that maintain and increase its value.


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Election actors deplore the rise in youth unemployment https://katmasters.com/election-actors-deplore-the-rise-in-youth-unemployment/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 13:31:32 +0000 https://katmasters.com/election-actors-deplore-the-rise-in-youth-unemployment/ Stakeholders in the elections in the municipality of Wenchi in the Bono region lamented the increase in youth unemployment in the country. They described the situation as fertile ground for terrorist groups to influence and attract unemployed youth overcrowded into terrorism and political violence. Stakeholders, comprising representatives of political parties, youth and women’s groups, traditional […]]]>

Stakeholders in the elections in the municipality of Wenchi in the Bono region lamented the increase in youth unemployment in the country.

They described the situation as fertile ground for terrorist groups to influence and attract unemployed youth overcrowded into terrorism and political violence.

Stakeholders, comprising representatives of political parties, youth and women’s groups, traditional leaders, members of assemblies and religious organizations, said electoral violence and extremism were threats to peace. , national stability and development.

Stakeholders expressed their concerns at a meeting of the Inter-Party Dialogue Committee (IPDC) in the regional town of Bono in Wenchi and organized by the National Commission for Civic Education (NCCE) with the support of National Security.

Representatives of political parties

They believe that collective efforts are needed to preserve the peace that Ghana now enjoys.

Adjei Darkwah, a national security officer, retired Adjei Darkwah, stressed the importance for Ghanaians to guard against possible acts of threat to the peace and stability of the country.

He said land and chiefdom conflicts, corruption and marginalization are some of the factors that could trigger violence in various societies.

Election actors deplore the rise in youth unemployment
Francis Cudjoe, City Manager of Wenchi, NCCE

WO1 Adjei Darkwah urged parents to be vigilant about their children’s movements and be wary of friends they make.

NCCE Wenchi City Manager Francis Cudjoe said the IPDC meeting aims to reignite dialogue between political parties and other stakeholders on the collective responsibility of ensuring peaceful coexistence as a cornerstone of cohesion national.

“This commitment aims to deepen the existing collaboration between the NCCE, political parties, youth, security agencies, district assemblies, chiefs, traditional authorities, civil society and community leaders as important actors. to ensure peace and security in Ghana, ”Cudjoe added. .

He encouraged all electoral actors to use dialogue, in particular Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), to resolve their differences.

The stakeholders issued a joint statement in which they pledge to ensure the peace and security of the country.


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Maintain high standards of trust in difficult times https://katmasters.com/maintain-high-standards-of-trust-in-difficult-times/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://katmasters.com/maintain-high-standards-of-trust-in-difficult-times/ There is no doubt that businesses are going through difficult times as they navigate an environment of low consumer confidence and diminished investor confidence in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. At the same time, they need to balance the expectations of all stakeholders in their organizations. Gaining stakeholder confidence in these times would be […]]]>

There is no doubt that businesses are going through difficult times as they navigate an environment of low consumer confidence and diminished investor confidence in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. At the same time, they need to balance the expectations of all stakeholders in their organizations.

Gaining stakeholder confidence in these times would be a daunting task for some, but two companies – Malayan Banking Bhd (Maybank) and Sime Darby Property Bhd – have succeeded. Their efforts to establish a corporate culture based on trust earned them the top two accolades at the recently held PwC Malaysia 2021 Building Trust Awards.

Maybank was named winner in the FBM KLCI category – the third time the nation’s largest banking group has won this award after past wins in 2019 and top awards in 2015. Sime Darby Property was named winner in the category FBM Mid 70 Index.

It takes into account how companies communicate about value creation, as well as how they are seen to be building trust through the prism of their stakeholders. The awards continue to be independent, as no nominations or submissions are accepted, and an independent jury makes the final decision on the winners in a virtual meeting.

The awards were designed by PwC to recognize and celebrate companies that have made significant efforts to build stakeholder confidence.

“Our path to pricing is part of how we play our role as a responsible corporate citizen, and in doing so, we help foster a stronger, trust-based capital market. And, as we have seen over the past couple of years, there is a need for companies to build trust with their stakeholders at a time when it is both more fragile and more complicated to gain, ”Soo Hoo said. Khoon Yean, Managing Partner of Pwc Malaysia. Edge in an email response.

He adds that the company’s investment in its Building Trust program aligns with PwC’s new global strategy – “The New Equation” – which recognizes the major changes shaping the world and is a testament to PwC’s commitment to providing lasting results to its customers and the community for a positive result. and lasting impact.

“As our journey towards these awards unfolded in 2020 and 2021, key events and developments defining the market landscape have shaped how we have improved our measurement of trust-building efforts. A few key priorities included the emerging focus on environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues.

“By expanding the scope of companies qualifying for the awards to mid-sized companies listed on the FBM Mid 70 index, we were able to achieve our goal of integrating more segments of Malaysian business,” says Soo Hoo.

He adds that the winning companies, unsurprisingly, performed well in all aspects of the rewards methodology, and the judges could see that they had gone to great lengths to go beyond short-term financial gains. .

“The winning companies were able to take into account what is important to all their stakeholders, beyond just investors, and demonstrated that the key attributes of capacity, accountability and transparency help build trust with all their stakeholders, ”he said.

Maybank sets the tone

Maybank Group Chairman and CEO Datuk Seri Abdul Farid Alias ​​said the banking group’s victory is a testament to the remarkable success of its employees in establishing and maintaining trust in its various commitments and channels of stakeholders, internal and external.

“Maybank believes in honest, open and transparent communications, which has clearly served us well in the public eye and even internally, as evidenced by the multiple wins since the inception of these awards in 2015. Although none of our actions aims to garner rewards and recognition, we remain true to our mission to humanize financial services and our TIGER values ​​(teamwork, integrity, growth, excellence and efficiency, relationship building) because it is the right thing to do, ”he said in an email response to The Bord.

So how did Maybank continue to build confidence in these difficult times? Abdul Farid says the banking group – which was founded in 1960 – has had more than six decades to refine its practice of building trust by learning from its shortcomings and striving to improve themselves.

“It is only by being open to positive and negative feedback that we can learn to grow and improve for the better. It is certainly not an easy task and it is human nature to be on the defensive, but if we anchor ourselves around our mission statement then we are reminded of why we are in this business in the first place. It’s about serving our customers and broader stakeholder groups. Open and transparent communication is therefore absolutely essential to build trust, ”says Abdul Farid.


He adds that the pandemic has been a catalyst for Maybank to emerge even stronger in its efforts to reach and support its stakeholder groups through targeted initiatives.

“It was about leading by example. Our top priority has been to ensure the well-being of our customers and employees. For our clients, we have worked closely to offer repayment assistance programs as well as various other notable initiatives to address the cash flow challenges brought on by the pandemic, ”he said.

“For our employees, we have deployed various programs internally to promote mental, physical and social well-being given the new remote working environment. “

On why it is important for Maybank to build trust, Abdul Farid says trust is the foundation on which any successful and lasting relationship is built. “Once established, it will bring out the best in everyone, whether it’s within a team, an organization, a community or even a country.

“There is a positive correlation between trust and organizational performance, which is why the Maybank culture is aligned with our mission statement and helps us always do the right thing, especially when no one is watching. “

Regarding efforts to build confidence in the future, Abdul Farid reiterates that there must always be alignment between actions and words. “Speak and communicate the same way. Trust cannot be taken for granted or abused, not even for a fraction of a second. When we align our actions and words with our mission statement, it serves as a good anchor to guide us forward.

“It’s about always doing the right thing, even when no one is looking. As long as this is clear in our minds, everything else we do will be achieving the goal of protecting and improving the organization and our stakeholders. “

Sime Darby Property – building trust through its products

As a real estate developer responsible for the construction of over 100,000 homes in the Klang Valley, Negeri Sembilan and Johor, Sime Darby Property believes it is important to maintain the trust it has built over the years with many generations of Malaysians.

“Buying a new home or business space is usually one of the most important financial or investment decisions our buyers make. To develop and maintain trust, we strive to provide the best products and services to our customers. The quality that we promise through our products is essential to earn their trust, ”Sime Darby Property Group Managing Director Datuk Azmir Merican said in an email response to The Edge.

Azmir states that the group is proud to have been recognized by PwC Malaysia as the winner in the FBM Mid 70 Index category. “Trust is a very important element in our business and to be honored with this distinction is a testament to the way we conduct our business with transparency and accountability. We will remain committed to maintaining the trust all of our stakeholders have in Sime Darby Property today and in the years to come. “

The past year and a half has been a difficult one for Sime Darby Property and their team has had to redouble their efforts to ensure that the group continues to deliver value to all of its stakeholders and maintain their trust.


“We had the opportunity to rethink how we can continue to connect with our customers while addressing one of the biggest challenges in the industry. It drove us to innovate and be creative in problem solving and reaching out to customers when they couldn’t come to us.

“We have introduced our in-house developed online reservation system, which allows our clients to view and reserve their potential homes, as well as perform secure online payment transactions. We also introduced the Virtual Sales Gallery which offered a new in-home viewing experience and we stepped up our social media engagements, ”said Azmir.

On how Sime Darby Property will continue to build trust in the future, Azmir says the group is determined to be a ‘force for good’ and will continually engage with its stakeholders to gain critical feedback, as well as to optimize the opportunities to integrate sustainability into its operations. .

“We have taken steps to change the way we conduct our business to minimize the impact of our operations by integrating ESG principles into our operations, in order to remain transparent to our stakeholders.

“We build our resilience through biodiversity, design, products and communities; and will continue to provide value creation efforts that contribute to the betterment of society, play an active role in reducing our carbon footprint and create long-term economic value in a responsible manner, ”he said declared.

PwC will continue to champion the trust agenda

Soo Hoo says PwC is committed to continuing on its journey to promote trust between businesses. “We are encouraged by what we are seeing – businesses building trust in different ways, from rolling out initiatives to promote small businesses, coming together to support the national Covid-19 vaccination campaign and responding important customer needs, including the recognition of errors. These are important steps in advancing confidence in business. And we want to encourage companies to continue to build trust in the way they engage with their stakeholders, influence the younger generation, and address important societal issues.

“Because we can’t do it alone, we hope to see more companies, beyond our award winners, join us in giving confidence a voice. It is through our combined voices that trust will flourish, having a lasting impact on our community. “


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Arik Air recalls dismissed pilots after stakeholder intervention – https://katmasters.com/arik-air-recalls-dismissed-pilots-after-stakeholder-intervention/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 04:09:52 +0000 https://katmasters.com/arik-air-recalls-dismissed-pilots-after-stakeholder-intervention/ Following the intervention of players in the aeronautical industry, including the National Association of Pilots and Airline Engineers, Arik Air has recalled the pilots it has dismissed. The development was confirmed on Saturday by two top shots from the National Association of Airline Pilots and Engineers. The pilots were declared sacked by the airline after […]]]>

Following the intervention of players in the aeronautical industry, including the National Association of Pilots and Airline Engineers, Arik Air has recalled the pilots it has dismissed.

The development was confirmed on Saturday by two top shots from the National Association of Airline Pilots and Engineers.

The pilots were declared sacked by the airline after going on strike last week on Tuesday.

Their grievance was centered on their well-being.

But on Saturday, NAAPE Chairman Arik Air Section Mudi Muhammad said the issue had been resolved amicably.

NAAPE National President Galadima Abednego also confirmed that the issue has been resolved.

Abdnego said the pilots have even resumed their duties.

Muhammad said: “When the layoff occurred, we immediately entered into negotiations with management with the help of critical stakeholders such as the current Managing Director of Aero Contractors, Captain Abdullahi Mahmood, who is a former member of Arik’s staff.

“We are a family in Arik and that’s how we approached the subject: as one family.

“Our association was able to meet the management and after fruitful negotiations, they agreed to recall the dismissed pilots and as I speak to you, they are in the sky.

“We are grateful to the stakeholders who made efforts to get the issue resolved. “


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Stakeholders support CBN’s agro-industrial interventions https://katmasters.com/stakeholders-support-cbns-agro-industrial-interventions/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 00:11:11 +0000 https://katmasters.com/stakeholders-support-cbns-agro-industrial-interventions/ Stakeholders from the agricultural and industrial sectors unanimously declared their support for the newly launched program, “100 projects for EVERY 100 days”, initiated by the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) to stimulate agro-industrial activities, create opportunities for development. employment and stimulate the post-war period. COVID-19 economic recovery in the country. The apex bank’s laudable program […]]]>

Stakeholders from the agricultural and industrial sectors unanimously declared their support for the newly launched program, “100 projects for EVERY 100 days”, initiated by the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) to stimulate agro-industrial activities, create opportunities for development. employment and stimulate the post-war period. COVID-19 economic recovery in the country. The apex bank’s laudable program comes at the right time, they say, as the country faces food security and food sufficiency challenges on all fronts.

They stressed that they would collectively lead the campaigns of this Central Bank of Nigeria’s “100 projects for EVERY 100 Days” program in the country, which will see every farmer take part and participate effectively in the program to achieve much needed food sufficiency. and security aspirations in Nigeria. Agro-industrial stakeholders also insisted on deepening these existing interventions in food production and industrial links through the Anchor Borrowers Program (ABP). Indeed, CBN had published guidelines for its “Production and Productivity” initiative earlier this month through the “100 Projects for EVERY 100 Days” initiative for Nigeria’s agricultural and manufacturing sectors to enable operators to take advantage of the program.

According to the umbrella bank’s guidelines for the new program, a maximum loan of N5 billion will be lent per debtor under the initiative, but any amount above the threshold will require special approval from its management. The main activities are existing agro-enterprises and projects with the potential to transform and revive the productive base of the economy. CBN said in the directive: “This is support for private sector companies with the aim of reducing some imports, increasing non-oil exports and improving the economy’s foreign exchange generating capacity. .

“These include manufacturing, agriculture and agribusiness; extractive industries, petrochemicals and renewable energies; healthcare and pharmaceuticals, logistics services and trade-related infrastructure; and any other activities that may be prescribed. The umbrella bank had revealed that the initiative was designed to support the federal government’s desire to boost productivity and economic diversification. “The facility is a long-term loan for the acquisition of factories and machinery, as well as working capital.

“The initiative will create a flow of finance and investment to companies with the potential to launch a trajectory of sustainable economic growth, accelerate structural transformation, promote diversification and improve productivity,” he said. he noted. The specific objectives are to catalyze the substitution of imports of targeted products; increase local production and productivity; increase non-oil exports; and improve the foreign exchange earning capacity of the economy. “This would also include a decrease in the volume and value of imports of industrial raw materials and an increase in the number of jobs created,” apex bank said. It will be recalled that the CBN was at the forefront of initiatives aimed at increasing food productivity, agro-industrial processing and entrepreneurial activities through existing and new businesses.

Thanks to PBA, there have been interventions in land preparation, supply of quality seeds, agrochemicals and harvesting of rice fields, maize, cassava, soybeans and, lately, wheat and sweet potato, among other crops. In November 2015, President Muhammadu Buhari launched the ABP to boost agricultural production and minimize food imports. Farmers captured under this program include those who grow cereals (rice, maize and wheat). The program aimed to create a link between businesses involved in food processing and smallholder farmers of key agricultural commodities required, through commodity associations. In an interview with the New Telegraph on the CBN 100 Projects for EVERY 100 Days initiative, a national president of the Association of All Farmers of Nigeria (AFAN), Kabir Ibrahim, explained that the association of Farmers will always support any good policy emanating from the current government meant boosting agriculture and transforming the economy in terms of stimulus intervention.



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IHRDA to educate stakeholders about bad laws https://katmasters.com/ihrda-to-educate-stakeholders-about-bad-laws/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 14:18:17 +0000 https://katmasters.com/ihrda-to-educate-stakeholders-about-bad-laws/ As part of this awareness workshop, IHRDA is also determined to bring about a situation that would help repeal or amend colonial laws which are considered bad laws in our constitution. The event was supported by the Open Society Initiative for West Africa. “So this is meant to start a conversation about how best to […]]]>

As part of this awareness workshop, IHRDA is also determined to bring about a situation that would help repeal or amend colonial laws which are considered bad laws in our constitution.

The event was supported by the Open Society Initiative for West Africa.

“So this is meant to start a conversation about how best to ensure that these colonial laws are either repealed or changed. The IHRDA cannot repeal laws. We cannot change the laws. But we can bring the stakeholders together so that we can come together to decide, really, the best way forward, ”says Gaye Sowe, Executive Director of IHRDA.

The main objective of the workshop was to provide participants with adequate information on the situation of petty crimes in The Gambia and the opportunities to take measures for the decriminalization, declassification and better policing of petty crimes in the country, using regional human rights standards and best practices. .

At the end, participants should be well informed about the petty crime situation in The Gambia; the decriminalization of poverty from a human rights perspective, regional standards on the decriminalization of petty crimes and state responsibility for decriminalization of petty crimes and its relevance to The Gambia.

“We do a lot of capacity building on the African human rights system. We are registered here because we wanted to be very close to the National Human Rights Commission (CNDH), but we are Pan-African in the sense that we cover the entire continent. So we do this by building the capacities of strong actors, governmental and non-governmental agencies on the African human rights system, ”said Gaye M. Sowe.

“By that, we are talking about the mechanisms and this is something that we have been doing since 1998, when we were registered. But all our capacity building for government officials, in some cases, civil society, we also do a lot of litigation. We have cases before all the regional mechanisms, ”he added.

“In the African court, we have two cases against The Gambia; the Kerr Mod Ali case and the other on the right to freedom of assembly, of association, law on public order, before the African Commission. We have nearly 10 or more cases against Congo Brazzaville, Congo DRC, Ethiopia, Sudan, Rwanda, Burundi and many more. We also have cases before the ECOWAS Court against Nigeria, against Mali, against Benin and another host country.

He added that they recently filed a petition against Cameroon over child marriage and another against Nigeria over children accused of witchcraft.

“Why are we here? Of course, we are not here to sue the Gambian government, but pushing for legislative reforms is certainly one of our priorities. We all know here that The Gambia has a constitution. constitution, we have the women’s law. We also have the children’s law. We know that our constitution is supreme and that same constitution guarantees the right to freedom of movement. It provides for the presumption of innocence, and of course, in addition to the constitution, we are also party to many treaties, including the right to freedom of movement, the right to dignity, the presumption of innocence, etc.

“Even though all these rights are guaranteed in our constitution, which we agreed earlier to be supreme, even though these rights are guaranteed in our African treaties that we have ratified, in international treaties that we have ratified, unfortunately, we have laws that do not speak. directly to the provisions of our constitution. Nor do they directly relate to the treaties that we have ratified. Some of these laws unfortunately target marginalized people in our countries. They target the homeless, the poor and the people who are really struggling to make a living. “

“We call some of these laws, especially those in the Criminal Code and other laws, minor offenses. The laws, in general, are very vague. They are phrased in very, very general terms and studies have shown that they are also discriminatory. If you look at the laws, there are laws that we inherited from our colonial masters; they are colonial relics and unfortunately some of them are phrased in very disrespectful terms.

“Check sections 160, 166 to 169 of our Criminal Code. What do you see? Offenses such as idleness and disorder, offenses such as thugs and vagrants; and even if you look at our whimsical dimension you would see terms like idiots, fools or whatever you might call it.

“Our Criminal Code was passed in 1933 and together with the laws we would be reviewing today. But unfortunately we really didn’t do a very good job making the necessary adjustments. So we decided it was important that we start looking at these laws; laws that send people to jail not because of what they have done, but because of a particular situation they found themselves in.

He added that it is as if someone is arrested, pursued and possibly sent to Mile II, not because of a crime committed but because of some unfortunate circumstance that one finds himself in. movement, and unfortunately you get caught because someone somewhere thinks you are idle and messy. You are arrested because someone out there thinks you are a thug and a vagabond, even before you are brought to justice to have your testimony heard.

He clarified that sending the people who committed these petty crimes to Mile II would not solve any problems, but rather try to acquire them skills, especially those who are seen as thugs and vagabonds, and education would be better. He tells of the belief that if they are skilled, they would not have time to idle and stroll.

Mr. Edmund Amarkwei Foley, Director of Programs at IHRDA, also argued that most minor infractions should not have been subject to criminal penalties and, as such, should be removed from the law books. .


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Empower stakeholders across oncology https://katmasters.com/empower-stakeholders-across-oncology/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 21:14:28 +0000 https://katmasters.com/empower-stakeholders-across-oncology/ Joseph Alvarnas, MD, Co-Chair of Patient-Centered Oncology Care® (PCOC), discussed the unique nature of PCOCs and what they offer to providers, payers, political leaders and the technology experts who participate in them. Alvarnas is Vice-President, Government Affairs; Senior Medical Director, Employer Strategy and Clinical Professor, Department of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope. […]]]>

Joseph Alvarnas, MD, Co-Chair of Patient-Centered Oncology Care® (PCOC), discussed the unique nature of PCOCs and what they offer to providers, payers, political leaders and the technology experts who participate in them. Alvarnas is Vice-President, Government Affairs; Senior Medical Director, Employer Strategy and Clinical Professor, Department of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope.

Who are the stakeholders involved in PCOC?

ALVARNAS: The beauty of this meeting is that it really helps to empower stakeholders across oncology. We’re not just talking about clinicians, we’re not just talking about leaders in healthcare systems, but also other core members: those in pharma, those who lead by helping develop pathways, those who lead the payor by exercising. truly new levels of creativity in payment systems.

Part of the beauty of this meeting is that you have stakeholders who often have their own meetings and often have separate conversations, and what you find not only in the panels, but also in the breaks between times when people have the chance to visit and talk and chat – whether through virtual means or in person – is this great cross-pollination of ideas. There’s a general level of excitement building up in this room as all of these various stakeholders, who quite rarely engage in these kinds of conversations, move further and further into the future. The beauty of oncology is what makes it so exciting, the diversity of stakeholders and the depth of conversations they have around improving our system.


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Manpower shortage or manpower calculation? Wisconsin stakeholders weigh in on workforce change https://katmasters.com/manpower-shortage-or-manpower-calculation-wisconsin-stakeholders-weigh-in-on-workforce-change/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 21:04:28 +0000 https://katmasters.com/manpower-shortage-or-manpower-calculation-wisconsin-stakeholders-weigh-in-on-workforce-change/ According to a panel of labor experts, this is forcing employers to adapt to a new labor market. “We have a fantastic opportunity to rethink the way work is done in this country. Because for too long so many of those jobs were bad jobs. They had very bad and unpredictable schedules, unpredictable incomes and […]]]>

According to a panel of labor experts, this is forcing employers to adapt to a new labor market.

“We have a fantastic opportunity to rethink the way work is done in this country. Because for too long so many of those jobs were bad jobs. They had very bad and unpredictable schedules, unpredictable incomes and unpredictable benefits, or predictable benefits that were mostly non-existent, ”Stephanie Bloomingdale, president of the AFL-CIO of Wisconsin, told a WisPolitics panel. in Madison on Tuesday, December 14.

People quit their jobs en masse during the pandemic – a trend that has not stopped. In Wisconsin, new jobless claims hit an eight-month high on Dec. 4, rising 37% from the previous week.

For some, it’s a choice – baby boomers are retiring, professionals looking for remote work options, or families realizing they can get by on just one income after staying home with it. their children during the pandemic.

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But for others, usually those at the lower end of the pay scale, quitting their jobs was a necessity. When bars and restaurants closed, many workers turned to industries like retail, healthcare or manufacturing to pay the bills. Others have left the labor market altogether.

Federal support in the form of improved unemployment benefits, stimulus checks and child tax credits has put workers in a financial position to take a break and consider their options.

People are quitting their jobs almost twice as fast as before the pandemic. And they’re in no rush to come back, said Michael Childers, a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Business.

“The workers are more selective and have that opportunity right now depending on the job market. And it becomes almost self-fulfilling. It’s kind of that retention cycle that we find ourselves in,” Childers said during Tuesday’s event.

Rising unionization, employee action across the United States

With labor shortages plaguing nearly every industry, employees are the hot commodity. Those who re-enter the labor market try to do so on their own terms. From Starbucks and John Deere to Kellogg and Wisconsin’s own Colectivo Coffee, this fall has seen an increase in employee collective action.

Advocates say the pandemic has highlighted inequalities in the workplace. Online retailers like Amazon and Walmart made huge profits during the pandemic while workers worked on the front lines.

“These are the workers who have helped us through this pandemic,” Bloomingdale said. “The CEOs of these companies weren’t getting up and going to the office or the factory. They were zooming in. But the workers, on the whole, weren’t able to.”

So the workers retreat.

Bloomingdale compared the recent boom in union activism to the post-World War II era, when union membership was at an all-time high and a strong middle class emerged.

“We can go back there,” Bloomingdale said. “But it’s going to require a lot of different things, including workers defending themselves in the workplace. And that’s what we saw in October – 100,000 people on strike across the country. That means workers say, “Enough is enough. We are fed up with rotten jobs with bad working conditions. And we want more. ‘”

Childers said current levels of employee activism may not compare to historical numbers, but said it has certainly increased since the start of the pandemic. And most aren’t even coordinated efforts like the headline-grabbing strikes.

“These are kind of clues to other workers that if it’s bad we maybe have an agency to make things better. And I think that’s part of what we’re seeing right now,” said Childers.

One of the strongest forms of protest was simply not to return to jobs that were difficult even before the pandemic.

This dynamic is playing out acutely in bars and restaurants.

“A lot of people have had a hard time making ends meet in the restaurant industry,” Bloomingdale said. “The hours were unpredictable. Tips were sometimes high, sometimes low.”

The state lost 22% of its restaurant and hospitality workforce during the pandemic, said Kristine Hillmer, president of the Wisconsin Restaurant Association. In Dane County alone, it was 44%. And Hillmer said the losses are likely permanent as workers have moved on to other industries.

As a result, the industry is struggling more than others to fully recover. Hillmer said restaurants are cutting back hours and seating just to avoid exhausting the limited staff they have.

Hillmer said 75% of the association’s members are small, independent businesses, where owners often work alongside their staff.

“I don’t know of any restaurateur who doesn’t consider their staff like family. However, this business has yet to survive,” Hillmer said Tuesday. “If these companies don’t survive, then these jobs are gone. “

“People want to be treated like family, but they also want to be able to be paid”

But Bloomingdale said people need more than just camaraderie at a job.

“In order to get more people to work in these industries, we need to pay better, have better hours and better working conditions. And so yes, people want to be treated like family, but they also want to be able to be paid. , ”Bloomingdale said.

Hillmer said most restaurants have increased wages and benefits. She claims you can’t find a dishwasher in Milwaukee right now for less than $ 17 an hour. But after such a devastating year, the service sector is emerging from a much deeper hole than others, and operating at limited capacity makes it difficult to catch up.

Hillmer said 15% of restaurants in the state have closed permanently during the pandemic. She expects the number to increase.

“Right now, restaurants and the hospitality industry are in the fight of a lifetime,” Hillmer said. “Yes, we want to increase wages, we want to offer paid time off, we have to do it. But if that also means that your burger now costs $ 25… and no one can afford it, and the business goes out, then everyone loses. “

With inflation the highest it has been in decades and unemployment increasing gradually, many people expect workers to start returning faster. But the full economic recovery of Wisconsin’s restaurant industry is not expected until 2023 – a timeline that could be stretched further if new variants of COVID-19 continue to surface.

And if the industry is unable to transform itself into a person people actually want to work for, labor shortages could be an ongoing problem.

Childers painted a somewhat bleak picture of an automated restaurant experience with self-service kiosks.

“If you can’t find workers, you find ways to get the job done,” Childers said.

Wisconsin Public Radio can be streamed locally on 91.3 KUWS-FM and on wpr.org.

Wisconsin Public Radio, Copyright 2021, Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System and Wisconsin Educational Communications Board.


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